Fall Semester Course

 

The Global Leadership Living Learning Community helps students gain knowledge and skills, equipping them to problem-define and problem-solve in international and global contexts.  The course explores how leadership is practiced in different countries and applied to particular problems. During the Fall semester, all GLLLC students take a 2000-level Global Leadership course.  Designed and taught by the GLLLC Faculty Director, Dr. Joy Harris, this course exists specifically for the LLC and is only available to GLLLC students each Fall.  This project-based course allows small, rotating teams of GLLLC students to look at the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, determining what leadership looks like related to each goal in a particular regional and cultural context.  Global Leadership students will register for one of the GLLLC courses listed below. 


Fall 2020 Course Info:
GT 2803, CRN 92913
Meeting Days/Times: MW 2:00-3:15
Location: Brittain Rec 
Instructor: Dr. Joy Harris

GT 2803, CRN 92914
Meeting Days/Times: MW 3:30-4:15
Location: Brittain Rec 
Instructor: Dr. Joy Harris

Sample Syllabus

                                    un17.jpg

These SDGs strive to create a better world for future generations, aiming to end poverty, build economic growth, and address social needs, including education, health, social protection, job opportunities, climate change, and environmental protection.  Governments worldwide are expected to take ownership of these goals, establishing a personalized, culturally-unique national framework to achieve the goals.  The GLLLC course looks at these SDGs and at the effectiveness of the varying leadership styles, depending on the international context.

Understanding the Dimensions of Sustainable Development 

The 2030 Agenda and the SDGs are not merely items on a checklist, but represent a holistic approach to understanding and tackling problems by guiding us to ask the right questions at the right time. We need to consider several challenges in order to work out how they connect with and impact upon each other. But how does that work? Watch this explainer video to learn more.

Global Leadership Spring 2021 Course Options

All GL students must enroll in one course from this list.  

Note: Spots in these courses are not guaranteed, please register as soon as possible! 

Additional classes may be petitioned to be included by emailing GL Leadership with specific course requests by Friday, November 20.  Please note that any modern language course can be added as long as five current GL students enroll in the same course (same section, same time, etc.) 

  

BIOS 1107 – Biological Principles, 3 credit hours 

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab. This course meets core area D requirements.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

30591 

9:30am-10:20am 

M,W,F 

Howey L1 

Emily Grace Weigel & Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

BIOS 1107 – Biological Principles Lab, 1 credit hour 

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab. 

 This course meets core area D requirements. Must be taken in conjuction with BIOS 1107.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

30592 

12:30pm-3:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

32063 

12:30pm-3:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

30599 

12:30pm-3:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

30598 

3:30pm-6:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

30600 

3:30pm-6:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

30600 

12:30pm-3:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

21563 

3:30pm-6:15pm 

Clough 481 

Colin Harrison 

Hybrid 

 

DOPP 2001- Prep for Work in Global Economy, 1 credit hour  

This course is a one-credit, pass/fail seminar and is geared toward students who intend to intern/work abroad during or after their time at Georgia Tech. Ideal students for this course include first, second, and third year undergraduates; students who wish to participate in the Global Research and Internship Program; students who are in the International Plan; students with a desire to work internationally in the near future. Topics covered include: intercultural communication, cultural differences in work styles and management styles; seeking and applying for internships/jobs in a global context; and case studies in international business. It is not necessary to have previous international experience, but a strong desire to learn about other cultures is preferred.  

Section  

Time  

Day  

Location  

Instructor  

TBD  

2:00pm-2:50pm  

W  

Brittain Rec Classroom  

Hannah Moon  

Limited to 20 students. Use the following link to apply for a permit for the class:  

https://webforms.oie2.gatech.edu/node/4445

 

EAS 1601- Habitable Planet, 3 credit hours 

Introduction to the origin and evolution of Planet Earth, creation of the universe and the elements, early history of Earth, radioisotope geochemistry and the timing of events in the universe, the galaxy, and on Earth. Formation of the atmosphere and oceans. Climate. This course meets core area D requirements.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

20423 

2:00pm-3:15pm 

T,R 

TBA 

Heather Tiffany Chilton & Jennifer L Mcguire 

Remote 

EAS 1601 – Habitable Planet Lab, 1 credit hour 

Introduction to the origin and evolution of Planet Earth, creation of the universe and the elements, early history of Earth, radioisotope geochemistry and the timing of events in the universe, the galaxy, and on Earth. Formation of the atmosphere and oceans. Climate. Must be taken in conjunction with EAS 1601. e. This course meets core area D requirements. 

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

21298 

8:00am-10:45pm 

TBA 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Remote 

21297 

12:30pm-3:15pm 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Hybrid 

20780 

3:30pm-6:15pm 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Hybrid 

20430 

3:30pm-6:15pm 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Hybrid 

20781 

8:00am-10:45am 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Hybrid 

21300 

12:30pm-3:15pm 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Hybrid 

21563 

3:30pm-6:15pm 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton 

Hybrid 

26832 

8:00am-10:45am 

Kendeda 288 

Heather Tiffany Chilton  

Hybrid 

 

ECON 2101- The Global Economy, 3 credit hours 

Historical and theoretical understanding of global economy, including international trade, finance, investment production; regional economic integration; economic development; environment, using micro and macro-economic principles. This course fulfills the IP Global Economics course requirement, fulfills a Social Science requirement, and fulfills a requirement for the Global Development minor. *This course cannot be taken by a student who already has credit for ECON 2100, 2015, or 2106, which some students earn through AP courses. Economics, Economics and International Affairs, Global Economics & Modern Language, and Business/Management majors cannot take this class.* 

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

31622** 

9:30am-10:45am 

M,W 

TBA 

Usha C Nair-Reichert 

Remote 

31615 

9:30am-10:45am 

M,W 

TBA 

Usha C Nair-Reichert 

Remote 

31171 

TBA 

TBA 

TBA 

Elizaveta Gonchar 

Remote-- asynchronous 

**This section (31622) is only open for IP students. You must be IP and email Whitney Buser 

(wbuser3@gatech.edu for a permit (let him know you are IP and do so ASAP).  

 

ENGL 1102 – Energy & the Environment in the Humanities, 3 credit hours 

Humanistic research has deepened global conversations about energy usage and environmental issues in the contemporary world. The environmental humanities study narratives of complex relationships between human beings and the environment, including the impact of unchecked energy consumption on the global climate as well as vulnerable indigenous communities. Besides analyzing environmental literature and media that employ a range of rhetorical strategies, students in this course will compose digital projects to convey their own arguments regarding contemporary environmental debates. Students in this course will develop advanced skills in WOVEN communication (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal), in the process of communicating complex ideas regarding social justice and environmental ethics. While learning the principles of persuasive writing, visual rhetoric, and document design, students will compose multimodal artefacts such as, electronic essay, web exhibit, and digital posters. Scaffolding activities occurring in the classroom and online forums will promote active learning, collaborative work, and process-oriented composition. Students should expect to engage in activities like active classroom discussions, group presentations, peer review sessions, and collaborative digital scholarship projects. Course materials may include Tayeb Salih’s short story “The Doum Tree of Wad Hamid” (1962), Linda Hogan’s Solar Storms (1995), Arundhati Roy’s essay, “For the Greater Common Good” (1999), and Christopher McLeod’s documentary film Standing on Sacred Ground (2013). This course satisfies a humanities requirement.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

26785 

9:30 am - 10:45 am 

T,R 

Clough 123 

Alok B Amatya 

Hybrid 

23893 

2:30 pm - 1:45 pm 

T, R 

Clough 125 

Alok B Amatya 

Hybrid 

ENGL 1102 – Science, Art, & Justice, 3 credit hours 

Everything is political, from science to art. In an era of climate change, protests for racial justice, and rising inequality, it is more important than ever to understand the relationship between science and art in effecting public opinion. This course will explore, briefly, the relationship between science and art in a few moments of modern human history—slavery, colonization, industrialization, the development of fossil fuels, the development of nuclear power, and climate change. The course aims to show that science and art can work together, but have been at odds in the past or even collectively wrong. The first half of the course will survey a few moments from the 19th century and conclude with historical research on the interplay of art and science. The second half of the course will focus on the 20th century and involve a team project where students will describe the relationship between art and science today. As a Serve-Learn-Sustain affiliated course, this class will identify relationships among ecological, social, and economic systems, with an especially focus on communities and environmental justice. Through all this the class will highlight the forms of WOVEN (written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal) communication as we consider how to connect science and art in the 21st century. In order to develop and deploy rhetorical knowledge students will compose and design research papers, oral presentations, and websites. Other graded elements will include project brainstorms, outlines, peer review, and shorter reflections. Ultimately, the course will provide students with opportunities to discuss, practice, and reflect on rhetoric alongside the tools to critique the relationships between science, art, and justice. This course meets a humanities requirement. 

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

34005 

12:30 pm - 1:20 pm 

M,W,F 

Clough 131 

Kent Linthicum 

Hybrid 

34006 

11:00 am - 11:50 am 

M,W,F 

Skiles 302 

Kent Linthicum 

Hybrid 

 

INTA 1110- Intro to International Relations, 3 credit hours 

An introduction to the major principles, concepts, actors, and theories of the international system and their application to current issues in world affairs.  This course fulfills the IP International Relations course requirement, fulfills a Social Science requirement, and fulfills a requirement of the International Affairs minor. Open to INTA/IAML/EIA majors only.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

22903 

3:30pm-4:20pm 

T,R,F 

Instr Center 209 

Kuen-Da Lin 

Hybrid 

 

INTA 2050-Intro to Global Development, 3 credit hours 

Mainstream and critical approaches to development, the role of diverse institutions and projects, and implications for sustainability in the countries of the global south.  This course fulfills requirements for the following: IP Global Economics course, Social Science, Global Development minor, and Sustainable Cities minor.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

25792 

9:30am-10:45am 

T,R 

Howey L2 

Alberto Jose Fuentes 

Hybrid 

 

MGT 3118 – Cross-Cultural Management, 3 credit hours 

This course develops students' global awareness to better understand and cope with the issues and challenges that managers face when working across international boundaries. This course meets a requirement of the minor in International Business, Language, and Culture for Business majors.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

34768 

2:00pm-3:15pm 

T,R 

Business 102 

Dong Liu 

Hybrid 

 

MGT 3660 – International Business, 3 credit hours 

Examines the position of the U.S. in world markets, various types of international business transactions, and the relationship of business to global economic, political-legal and cultural forces. This course meets the IP Global Economics requirement.  

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

26850 

3:30pm-4:45pm 

M,W 

Business 101 

Arnold E. Rubinoff 

Hybrid 

22956 

5:00pm-6:15pm 

M,W 

Business 101 

Diane Florence Alleva 

Hybrid 

 

MGT 4803- Special Topics (Social Impact: In-Depth Exploration and Design), 3 credit hours  

This course is for students who are passionate about social (and/or environmental) issues, and have identified an interest area where they want to make real change by developing an innovative solution.  The course will serve as a guide in the students' problem solving journey by exploring topics like: human-centered design, social impact assessment, customer discovery, sustainable communities, and more.  Students will connect with area experts who will serve as mentors and provide feedback throughout the semester.  Much of the course will be conducted "workshop style" with guest speakers presenting on topics that will help teams with their project's development.  There will also be plenty of opportunity for peer learning where students can share their feedback and advise with classmates.  The end goal is to have a project ready for entry in the Ideas to Serve Competition - Tech's social innovation event - to compete for up to $10K in start-up funds.  The course is also under consideration for the Leadership Minor and the Entrepreneurship Certificate.  This course is ideal for students who already have an idea for a solution to a social problem and need guidance and resources to move from idea to action.  If you do not have a specific idea already, you can team up with someone in the class who does.  Everyone with a passion for improving the human condition is welcome! 

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

28629 

5:00pm-6:15pm 

Business 103 

Dorottya Pap 

Hybrid 

28629 

6:30pm-7:45pm 

Business 103 

Dorottya Pap 

Hybrid 

Have questions? Email Dori Pap at dori.pap@ile.gatech.edu 

 

ML 2500- An Introduction to Cross-Cultural Studies, 3 credit hours 

This course introduces students to literature and film from around the globe and teaches comparative literary and cultural studies analysis. 

Section 

Time 

Day 

Location 

Instructor 

Class Method 

31550 

3:30pm-4:45pm 

T,R 

D.M. Smith 11 

Amanda Weiss 

Hybrid 

This class fulfills 3 credit hours for the Core Area C: Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics requirement.  This year’s theme is “The Future in Japan” and focuses on Japanese science fiction and technology from Meiji to the present. This course is taught in English and explores Japanese history/society through literature, film, and technology. For questions contact:  Amanda Weiss (amanda.weiss@modlangs.gatech.edu)