Global Leadership Courses

Fall Semester Course

The Global Leadership Living Learning Community helps students gain knowledge and skills, equipping them to problem-define and problem-solve in international and global contexts.  The course explores how leadership is practiced in different countries and applied to particular problems. During the Fall semester, all 118 GLLLC students take a 2000-level Global Leadership course together.  Designed and taught by the GLLLC Faculty Director, Dr. Joy Harris, this course exists specifically for the LLC and is only available to GLLLC students each Fall.  This project-based course allows small, rotating teams of GLLLC students to look at the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, determining what leadership looks like related to each goal in a particular regional and cultural context.  

Fall 2019 Course Info:
GT 2803, CRN 90157
Meeting Days/Times: TR 3-4:15
L
ocation: Brittain Rec 
Instructor: Dr. Joy Harris

Sample Syllabus

                                    un17.jpg
These SDGs strive to create a better world for future generations, aiming to end poverty, build economic growth, and address social needs, including education, health, social protection, job opportunities, climate change, and environmental protection.  Governments worldwide are expected to take ownership of these goals, establishing a personalized, culturally-unique national framework to achieve the goals.  The GLLLC course will look at these SDGs and at the effectiveness of the varying leadership styles, depending on the international context.

Understanding the Dimensions of Sustainable Development 

The 2030 Agenda and the SDGs are not merely items on a checklist, but represent a holistic approach to understanding and tackling problems by guiding us to ask the right questions at the right time. We need to consider several challenges in order to work out how they connect with and impact upon each other. But how does that work? Watch this explainer video to learn more.

 

Global Leadership Spring 2020 Course Options

 

During the Spring semester, GL students must choose between 8-10 regularly-offered Georgia Tech classes with each LLC resident selecting one.  The classes are in a range of subjects to be appealing to all majors and can often meet existing major, minor, or International Plan requirements.  Please note that not all courses are guaranteed to be offered each spring, though most routinely are.

All Global Leadership students are required to choose one of the following courses.

*Note: Spots in these courses are not guaranteed, please register as soon as possible!!!!

 

DOPP 2001- Prep for Work in Global Economy, 1 credit hour

This course is a one-credit, pass/fail seminar and is geared toward students who intend to intern/work abroad during or after their time at Georgia Tech. Ideal students for this course include first, second, and third year undergraduates; students who wish to participate in the Global Internship Program; students who are in the International Plan; students with a desire to work internationally in the near future. Topics covered include: intercultural communication, cultural differences in work styles and management styles; seeking and applying for internships/jobs in a global context; and case studies in international business. It is not necessary to have previous international experience, but a strong desire to learn about other cultures is preferred.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

38948

3:00pm-3:50pm

W

Savant 308

Hannah Moon

 

Limited to 20 students. Use the following link to get a permit for the class:

https://oie2.gatech.edu/content/permit-request-dopp-2001-preparing-work-global-economy

 

ECON 2101- The Global Economy, 3 credit hours

Historical and theoretical understanding of global economy, including international trade, finance, investment production; regional economic integration; economic development; environment, using micro and macro-economic principles. This course fulfills the IP Global Economics course requirement, fulfills a Social Science requirement, and fulfills a requirement for the Global Development minor. *This course cannot be taken by a student who already has credit for ECON 2100, 2015, or 2106, which some students earn through AP courses.*

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

34458**

12:00pm-1:15pm

T,R

Clough 262

Christine Perry Ries

39349

3:00pm-4:15pm

M,W

Klaus 2456

Xi Mao

**This section (34458) is only open for IP students. You must be IP and email Casey Hampton casey.hampton@econ.gatech.edu for a permit (let him know you are IP and do so ASAP).

 

SPAN 3101- Conversation I, 3 credit hours

Development of communicative ability and cross-cultural awareness through discussion of contemporary issues in the Hispanic world.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

41101

12:00pm-1:15pm

T,R

Cherry Emerson 322

Adele Doughlin

**This course was petitioned for by a Global Leadership student and approved by a Global Leadership staff member.

 

GRMN 3026- Stylistics, 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to stylistic difference and idiomatic usages of German, expands vocabulary, and enlarges upon grammatical and syntactic structures. Taught in German. Credit not allowed for both GRMN 3026 and GRMN 3026.​

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

40944

12:20pm-1:10pm

MWF

Engr Science & Mech 201

K. Koppe

**This course was petitioned for by a Global Leadership student and approved by a Global Leadership staff member.

 

INTA 2001- Careers in International Affairs, 1 credit hour

This course provides students interested in International Affairs and considering global careers the opportunity to hear from and meet successful experts in various fields. It is an opportunity to build your professional network and develop the skills needed to build your confidence and capacity. It will examine major issues and careers in the field of international affairs. The course is designed to help students understand the opportunities and process by which they may explore careers related to International Affairs. Students will engage in self-assessment, professional development and plan their current and future academic career so as to obtain the knowledge, experience and skill sets to successfully pursue these opportunities.​

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

36585

1:55pm-2:45pm

W

ES&T L1205

Michael D. Salomone, Mikulas Fabry, Stephanie Jackson

**This course was petitioned for by a Global Leadership student and approved by a Global Leadership staff member.

This course is only open to INTA majors.

 

INTA 1110- Intro to International Relations, 3 credit hours

An introduction to the major principles, concepts, actors, and theories of the international system and their application to current issues in world affairs.  This course fulfills the IP International Relations course requirement, fulfills a Social Science requirement, and fulfills a requirement of the International Affairs minor.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

31527

10:10am-11:00am

M,W,F

Klaus 1456

Jason Rich

Non INTA-majors can register for INTA 1110 starting November 13.  The course is not expected to fill.

 

 

INTA 2030- Ethics in International Affairs, 3 credit hours

Surveys the main traditions and theories of international ethics with a focus on intervention and the use of force, human rights, self-determination, and global distributive justice. This course fulfills requirements for the following: IP International Relations course, Ethics, and Social Science.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

31529

12:00-1:15pm

T,R

Instr Center 103

Eliza Maria Markley

 

INTA 2050-Intro to Global Development, 3 credit hours

Mainstream and critical approaches to development, the role of diverse institutions and projects, and implications for sustainability in the countries of the global south.  This course fulfills requirements for the following: IP Global Economics course, Social Science, Global Development minor, and Sustainable Cities minor.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

35057

9:05am-9:55am

M,W,F

Bunger-Henry 380

Neha Kumar

 

MGT 4803- Special Topics (Social Impact: In-Depth Exploration and Design), 3 credit hours

This course is for students who are passionate about social (and/or environmental) issues, and have identified an interest area where they want to make real change by developing an innovative solution.  The course will serve as a guide in the students' problem solving journey by exploring topics like: human-centered design, social impact assessment, customer discovery, sustainable communities, and more.  Students will connect with area experts who will serve as mentors and provide feedback throughout the semester.  Much of the course will be conducted "workshop style" with guest speakers presenting on topics that will help teams with their project's development.  There will also be plenty of opportunity for peer learning where students can share their feedback and advise with classmates.  The end goal is to have a project ready for entry in the Ideas to Serve Competition - Tech's social innovation event - to compete for up to $10K in start-up funds.  The course is also under consideration for the Leadership Minor and the Entrepreneurship Certificate.  This course is ideal for students who already have an idea for a solution to a social problem and need guidance and resources to move from idea to action.  If you do not have a specific idea already, you can team up with someone in the class who does.  Everyone with a passion for improving the human condition is welcome!

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

38720

4:30pm-5:45pm

M, W

Business 200

Dorottya Pap

Have questions? Email Dori Pap at dori.pap@ile.gatech.edu

 

PSYCH 2005-Exploring Multi-Cultural Identity, 3 credit hours

This course explores multicultural identities and key multicultural competencies needed to succeed in a global and international society.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

37440

9:30am-10:45am

T, R

West Village 275

Andrew Adelman

 

CEE 4350 - Environmental Technology in the Developing World, 3 credit hours

CEE 4350 seeks to develop practical skills to evaluate environmental technologies in developing countries with a focus on sustainable and healthy communities. The global burden of disease is known to be dominated by a variety of environmental risk factors that include poor air quality (both indoors and outdoors), water borne diseases, and issues related to sanitation; potential solutions involve the application of promising technologies. This class will involve an interdisciplinary approach to the evaluation of and application of technologies, with emphasis on problem-based, hands-on learning. Students will become familiar with key health and environmental problems specific to developing regions; measurement techniques; social, cultural, and economic constraints that apply to design; and the planning and execution of a field project with local colleagues. This course satisfies requirements of the Global Engineering Leadership minor and the minor in Global Development.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

36079

1:30pm-2:45pm

T, R

ES&T L1116

Joseph Mark Brown

 

FREN 4064 - Sustainability & Development in the Francophone World (TAUGHT IN FRENCH), 3 credit hours

This course can be considered for students interested in studying French and pursuing a major, minor, or certificate in French. FREN 4064 introduces students to study French and Francophone sustainability practices and provides an introduction to French and Francophone social perspectives. This course will be primarily a topics-based course, and each class will focus on a different area of sustainability policy. A strong focus of the class will be in understanding issues in the design, implementation, and evaluation of French and Francophone environmental policy. We will evaluate policies designed to reduce water use and pollution, improve air quality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Students will develop their skills in explaining their theory of change and empirical evidence in various forms common to public policy jobs: memos, blog posts, one-pagers, etc. Course readings will include textbooks, policy pieces, blog posts, YouTube videos and podcasts, and academic articles. Another part of this course will explore the links between French and Francophone community and environmental sustainability using the lens of social-ecological resilience. What values/beliefs, knowledge, practices and norms have contributed towards the sustainability of French and Francophone resources and ecosystems? How are small social groups demonstrating resilience in the face of larger scale political, economic, cultural, and environmental change? Drawing on interdisciplinary social science literature, the course critically discusses concepts, theories and issues of resilience in French and Francophone societies. Students will: develop their analysis skills related to methodology for social and cultural studies; analyze documents and content related to sustainable development in France and Francophone; improve their oral and written communication skills in French at the mid-advanced level; and understand the importance of sustainability practices in French-speaking cultures today.

 

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

40901

8:00am-9:15am

T, R

Kendeda 110

Julie Hugonny

 

ENGL 1102 - Sovereignty, Energy, and Settler-Colonialism, 3 credit hours

The wealth of the United States is premised upon many things: hard work, inventiveness, an entrepreneurial spirit, and so on, but its first premise is land. Land that had been tended and kept by Native Americans. Land that was taken, stolen, or bought over the course of American expansion west. These lands offered new sources of biomass, fossil fuels, and even uranium to exploit. The American energy system benefited from these abundant fuels (in addition to the labor of enslaved Blacks). This course will explore the ethical/moral valences of energy under settler-colonialism, and engage with questions of indigenous sovereignty, community health, and energy aesthetics. The first half of the class focuses on the Treaty of New Echota of 1835 and the Cherokee deliberations at Red Clay through the writings of Elias Boudinot, John Ross, John Marshall, and others. This will culminate in the recreation of a counterfactual negotiation of the 1835 treaty, using Reacting to the Past curriculum, where students will represent important historical figures debating the ideas of Ross, Boudinot, and the U.S. Constitution. The second half of the class focuses on the modern challenges indigenous sovereignty faces under the settler-colonial energy regime, especially uranium mining and storage in the Southwest and the #NoDAPL movement from 2014–17. In co-ordination with Georgia Tech’s Serve-Learn-Sustain initiative, this part of the class will analyze the intersection between energy, sovereignty, and community health. Through this thematic framework we will highlight all forms of WOVEN (written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal) communication as we consider the moral and cultural implications of energy and sovereignty under settler-colonial rule. In order to develop and deploy rhetorical knowledge students will compose and design critical analyses, posters, speeches, research websites, and other texts. Other graded elements will include project brainstorms, outlines, peer review, and shorter reflections. Ultimately, the course will provide students with opportunities to discuss, practice, and reflect on rhetoric alongside the tools to critique systems of energy. This class fulfills a humanities requirement.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

30525

33938

8:00am-8:50am

11:15am-12:05pm

M,W,F

Kendeda 110

Kent Linthicum

 

ENGL 1102 - Sustainability Initiatives, 3 credit hours

Sustainability initiatives, from green development to alternative energy projects, aim to fulfill the needs of the present without sacrificing the well-being of the future. This class investigates the history and meaning of the future through contemporary visual media, early modern literature, and contemporary environmental policy. We will begin by illustrating concepts of “the future” and “futurity” through contemporary media such as The Terminator, Bladerunner, and Intersteller. To uncover ways in which our present is partially determined by the future we imagined hundreds of years ago, students will then investigate the history of the future as an idea popularized in early literature such as Thomas More’s Utopia and William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Finally, students will work with theoretical and political texts to investigate the ways that real-world projects come to be through a blend of visionary planning and practical action. Using a WOVEN approach to communication, which considers the interrelationship between Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes, this course invites students to articulate their own ideas about the future through a poster analysis of contemporary visual media, a creative world building project in which students redress a contemporary problem by inventing a new future, and a final presentation project that responds to the response to contemporary environmental crisis.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

29900

9:30am-10:45am

T,R

Clough Commons 280

McKenna Rose

 

BIOS 2300 - Ecology, 3 credit hours

Introduction to ecological processes at individual, population, and community levels that occur in plant, animal, and microbial taxa, and their relevance to current environmental problems. Prerequisites include: BIOS 1107(L), BIOS 1207(L), BIOS 1510, or BIOS 1511.

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

40134

12:20pm-1:10pm

M,W,F

Instr Center 215

Marc Weissburg

BIOL 2301 – Ecology Lab, 1 credit hour

Ecology Lab covers basic ecological phenomenon using urban ecological settings as the backdrop. As a class, we visit areas in the metro-Atlanta community to understand human-environment interactions within our ecosystem. We immerse ourselves in these communities to understand the short- and long-term consequences of environmental change and what ecologically can be done to keep ecosystems-- and related neighborhoods-- thriving. Must be taken in conjunction with BIOS 23

Section

Time

Day

Location

Instructor

401980

12:00pm-2:40pm

T

Kendeda 180

Emily Grace Weigel

40199

3:00pm-5:40pm

T

Kendeda 180

Emily Grace Weigel

40200

12:00pm-2:40pm

R

Kendeda 180

Emily Grace Weigel